Ihata Shelter for Abused Women and Children

A good story to tell

Ihata Shelter is a registered Non-Profit Organization dedicated to creating a better society by taking a stand and speaking out against gender-based violence. Ihata also supports victims of domestic violence, by creating a sanctuary providing a caring, clean and safe shelter with accommodation for up to six months.

Since its inception in February 2006, Ihata Shelter, which is based in the Cape Flats, has successfully clothed, counselled, empowered and sheltered 511 residents. These residents were made up of 231 women of all races and religions and 280 young children from new born to twenty years old. The shelter has also counselled over 580 community members who have been victims of domestic abuse.

Giving women the time and space they need to move forward, the shelter provides not only the basic necessities such as cooked meals, toiletries, clothing and bedding, but also workshops and education geared towards empowerment, independence and recovery. The workshops end with successful community re-integration. FoodBank SA assists Ihata with the provision of nutritious food, toiletries and detergents in order to be able to support the 51 beneficiaries daily. FoodBank SA rescues surplus edible food from retailers, wholesalers and manufacturers. This food is redistributed to 500 beneficiary organisations such as Ihata who turn serve 115 000 beneficiaries daily throughout South Africa.

In efforts to sustain themselves the shelter generates an income through a community shop selling second hand items, making and selling jewellery, growing and selling organically grown vegetables as well as running a small laundry service. Through these social enterprises and the support from FoodBank SA Ihata Shelter is working towards opening a crèche facility, as well as providing more workshops to their beneficiaries which will include arts and crafts classes, HIV/Aids and abuse educational programmes, occupational therapy and counselling sessions for the women and children.